Loaded Landscapes 2018

For the London Festival of Architecture 2018, the London Ambler presents ‘Tales From the North Bank’ – a special two-part walk exploring the shapeshifting architectural landscape north of the Thames featuring a range of contributions and turns by a range of authors, architects, artists, performers and historians.

Located between The City and Westminster, the ‘North Bank’ was settled first by the Saxons in the 7th century and by the Middles Ages it was at the heart of aristocratic life on the river, home to the great waterside palaces of Tudor England’s richest merchants, courtiers and noblemen. At the strategic mid-point between commercial and political power, it remade itself as London’s great and varied centres of law, newspapers and entertainment and is today a place of many faces, with grandiose architectural landmarks giving way to hidden secrets and discreet obscurities!

Tales From The North Bank, PART ONE
Saturday 09 June, 10.30 – 12.30

£16 standard BOOK HERE

From medieval cloisters and deafening press headlines to Gothic fantasies and Parisian boulevards, this walk explores the multiple identities and shapeshifting characters of the landscape between Blackfriars and the Aldwych to reveal London’s mighty North Bank through its best kept architectural secrets and spectacular sleeping giants. With on site contributions from performer and actor Jamie Bradley, Saxon archaeologist at the Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) Lyn Blackmore and Alex Scott-Whitby founder of architecture and creative consultancy ScottWhitbyStudio. More names to be confirmed.

 

 

Tales From The North Bank, PART TWO
Saturday 23 June, 10.30 – 12.30

£16 standard BOOK HERE

From monuments and watergates to palaces and hotels, this walk explores the multiple identities and shapeshifting characters of the landscape between Trafalgar Square and Somerset House to reveal London’s mighty North Bank through its best kept architectural secrets and spectacular sleeping giants. With on site contributions from architectural historian and author of ‘Post-Modern Buildings in Britain’ Elain Harwood and Egyptologist and ancient historian Dr John J. Johnston. More names to be confirmed.